Poetry in ‘Pillars’

Recently, I was reminded again of the power of film when an American viewer emailed me seeking a poem of mine that appeared in a short film by Nicholas Denton, Pillars (2017)

I blogged a little about that HERE but I saw when I looked again this week that the movie has now shifted from Vimeo to YouTube and you can see the whole thing there.

The poems shifts in and out of the narrative a bit, and is used at the end of this powerful film. It was lovely to see what Denton did with the poem and how poetry can be used in this visual medium.

Walden

I was lucky enough to visit Walden Pond on a trip to the USA over ten years ago now, in a time when travelling overseas seemed a normal thing that one might aspire to. It was a pilgrimage of place, to the place that inspired Thoreau in his life and writing.

You can read a bit more about that trip on my earlier post HERE

I was reminded of all this by this short film I came across, just called Walden, a Ewers Brothers Production with input from Ken Burns and narrated by Robert Redford. I enjoyed it on a rainy late winter morning. You might too.

You can read more about Walden HERE

Poetry in ‘The Pillars’

I was delighted to attend this week the short film festival Flickerfest in Melbourne featuring a range of short films focused on Melbourne, or by Melbourne film-makers.

One such film was Nicholas Denton’s film, The Pillars, set in Mt Martha and featuring a poem of mine as part of the script. The film was well made, well acted and beautifully lit. And it was nice to hear the poem read by an actor, and really interesting to see it in a new and different context.

It’s rare for a poet to have their work transformed in another medium, so it was a privilege to see my poem in this new light.

Patience (after Sebald)

I’ve always been a W. B. Sebald fan (just check my Warrick Book of the Year Awards if you don’t believe me!) so it was a real treat this week to see the film ‘Patience: After W.B. Sebald’, a doucmentary that traces some of his walking through East Anglia for his wonderful book, The Rings of Saturn, which was on as part of the Melbourne Film Festival.
A grainy, mainly black and white, rather creative homage to Sebald and the landscape that inspired and somehow frightened him, I recomend it highly and it did that thing that all good homages do: make you want to go back to the original text and read it again.

Improbable

I saw this tick the box rejection slip from the early twentieth century intended for film manuscripts on a blog this week. It doesn’t quite work for poetry although anyone who’s submitted poems or prose to magazines or editors has sometimes  had the feeling that something like this might be working in the background. No rejection slip is good; which one  of these reasons would you be least unhappy about? I’d take ‘Improbable’.